Mapperley Village

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Newspapers - 1890s


Sheffield Independent
Wednesday 22 January 1890

MEETING AT MAPPERLEY

Mr. Jarvis, treasurer of the Derbyshire Miners' Association, and Mr. Benjamin Gregory, Ilkeston, on Monday held a meeting at the Black Horse Inn, Mapperley. Mr. Gregory presided, and stated that they had been deputed by the Council to visit the outlying villages of the district to ask the miners to join the existing lodges or to form new ones; it was for them to say which coarse they would adopt.

Mr. Jarvis moved, "That this meeting, believing the improved condition of the miners of the country to be mainly due to the action and force of the various unions, and further believing that the only way to secure fair wages and just contracts is by solid combination calls upon all men in this county to join the Miners Association at once. Mr Jarvis speaking on the resolution, referred to the present crisis in the coal trade as being important to the miner in every sense. The question of unskilled labour was being agitated, and very rightly too. It was essentially necessary that the rights of the real and lifelong collier should be kept intact. It was only by banding themselves together that this could be accomplished. A Miner having seconded the resolution was carried with great enthusiasm.



Stealing a Fowl — An old man named Henry Booth was charged with stealing a fowl, value 2s, belonging to John Walker, of Mapperley.—Prosecutor said he was a farmer, living at Cotgrave Farm, Mapperley. On Friday last week prisoner was found with a fowl in his pocket near the farm, and witness identified the bird as his property. Prisoner declared that it was his own fowl, and that he had bought it, along with several more, at Derby on the previous day. -The prisoner protested to the Bench that the fowl was one of a score which he had bought at Derby. — Prosecutor said there was no private mark on the fowl, but he knew he fed it in his farmyard on Friday morning He did not, considering prisoner's age, wish to be hard on him.— A collier named Jedediah Wood said he saw the prisoner coming from the farm with the fowl in his pocket.—Superintendent Lumley said the prisoner, although 75 years of age, wandered about the country committing these little larcenies.— The magistrates sent the prisoner to gaol for a month.


Singular Accident in a Colliery
Derby Mercury Wednesday 02 April 1890

On Saturday afternoon an alarming accident occurred at the new shaft which is being sunk at West Hallam Colliery near Ilkeston, men were engaged in bricking the shaft when the ironwork connecting the trunk with the rope gave way. The trunk was precipitated down the shaft a considerable distance smashing the platform on which the men were working and causing them to fall in the water at the bottom of the shaft. The rope left the pulley wheel at the same time and it was only after some delay that the men were rescued from their precarious position, the water being several feet deep. The men were found to be more or less injured one of them so seriously as to necessitate his removal to the Ilkeston Cottage Hospital. It is regarded as little short of a miracle that men were not killed outright.


Serious Accident to a Contractor
Derby Mercury Wednesday 18 Feb 1891

The Glendon Coal Company is sinking a new air shaft at the Mapperley Colliery, for which Joseph Sanders and Fred Smith are the contractors. The shaft is 10 feet in diameter and the men are working at a depth of 349 yards. On Friday a shot had been placed in the shaft where Sanders was working which had not gone off, and he proceeded after the usual time to drill the hole out again when the shot ignited, inflicting on him serious injuries. One of his eyes was blown out, and the other severely injured. The poor fellow was brought to the surface, and Mr Walker, of Simon Field Farm having provided a cart; he was removed to Ilkeston Cottage Hospital where he now lies in a precarious position.


Terrible Accident
Derby Mercury Wednesday 7 Oct 1891

George Collins aged about 19, of Ilkeston and employed at the West Hallam Colliery, was leaving his work and, prior to going up the shaft walked across the pit bottom over the spot where the cage descends. He thought the cage was going up, but unfortunately the reverse was the case, and the cage caught him crushing him to the ground. The signal was at once given to the engineman to raise the cage, and he was got out terribly injured. He was bruised black all over, and complete paralysis of the lower part of his body showed that his spine was injured. He was taken home and Drs. Carroll and Paton called in, it was found that Collin’s back was broken low down, and whilst he may linger for some weeks it is practically impossible to survive the injury.

N B. It seems that Mr Collins may have survived for some time I have not found him on free BMD from 1891 to 1906 or at any inquest.


Derby Mercury

Wednesday 19 September 1894

HEANOR LICENSING SESSIONS

The adjourned Licensing Session was held at Heanor on Monday, Mr.E M Mundy being chairman of the Bench.

John Harvey and Joseph Birkin, Mapperley, applied for beer-off licenses at that village. Mr. J, Stone, solicitor. Derby, appeared to support the application on behalf of Birking, and Mr. Middleton, of Chestefield, appeared on behalf of Harvey. The Bench refused both applications.


Lincolnshire Free Press

Tuesday 3rd December 1895

MAPPERLEY COLLIERY CO., LIMITED,
Mapperley & Stanley Collieries, Derbyshire.
Head Offices : 18, Imperial Buildings, Halford Street Leicester.

The MAPPERLEY COLLIERY CO. beg to inform the inhabitants of SPALDING and district that they have opened a DEPOT at SPALDING MIDLAND COAL WHARF for the sale of their Coals.

They can with confidence recommend any of the qualities enumerated below, and if the public will compare the prices with those they have been paying, they will find it to their advantage to do business with the Company.
PRICES AT SPALDING MIDLAND COAL WHARF, For Nett Cash Prompt.

BEST BRIGHT COAL 15s. 9d. per ton,
Superior drawing-room Coal, burning brown ash.
OPEN-GRAINED HARD COAL  15s. 3d.
Very good house Coal, burning brown ash.
DERBY BRIGHTS 13 . 9d.
Good house Coal.
LONDON BRIGHTS 12s. 9d.
Good house Coal.
BRIGHT NUTS 12s. 9d
I to 4 inches in size, good house and bakers’ coal.
 SMALL BRIGHT NUTS 10s. 9d.
Half to one and half inches in size, same quality as Nuts.
PICKED HARD 12s. 9d.
A superior Steam Coal, and for ranges.
HARD COBBLES 12s. 3d.
A superior Coal for Ranges.

The Charge for Delivery (in addition to the above prices) is ls. 6d. per ton to any part of the town. Orders to be sent to The Mapperley Colliery Co., Ltd., Midland Railway Coal Depot, Spalding.

Mr. ED. BARNES, Agent.


Mapperley a Centenarian
Derby Mercury Wednesday 1 June 1892

On Sunday Mrs Hannah Harvey, widow of this place arrived at the age of 100 years. She is well known all over the Derbyshire district having many years ago travelled the district with her husband hawking pots and salt. She has been a widow about 33 years, and has been totally blind for the last 30 years, but her hearing, memory, and other faculties are perfect. Her youngest son is 75 years of age.


Derby Daily Telegraph
Saturday 1st February 1896

Failure Farmer and Contractor.—Today (Friday) a meeting was held at the Official Receiver's Offices, Derby, of the creditors of John Henry Pounder, farmer and contractor, of Park Hall Farm, Mapperley, Derbyshire.

The liabilities were £132. 6s 5d. to unsecured creditors, £60 8s. 7d. to fully secured creditors, £24 6s. 4d. to creditors for rent, etc., and £7 1s. Id. to creditors for rates, taxes, wages, etc., making a total £224 1s. 6d.

The assets were stock-in-trade (£10), farming stock (£l6), growing crops and tenant's right (£5l 3s.), furniture (£2O), surplus from securities in the hands of creditors fully secured (£4 11s. 5d.), making a total of £101 14s. 11d., from which £31 7s. 6d. has to be deducted for distrained rent and preferential rates, taxes, wages, and Sheriff's Charges, leaving the assets at £70 7s. 6d., the deficiency then being £61 17s. 11d.

No resolutions were passed, and the estate still remains in the hands of the Official Receiver.


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